By Zhiqi Guo, Elder & Disability Law Clinic Student, Spring 2017

When a client approaching us with a problem he or she wants us to solve, it not only raises a client-attorney relationship, but will also possibly raise a relationship between the attorney and a third party, especially in the elder and disability law clinic, when people need to be accompanied by another person, both ethical and practical issues will arise.

First possible issue is confidentiality between the client and attorney. For the attorney to be able to communicate with a third party, he or she need a permission from the client. However, attorney-client privilege protects only confidential communications between an attorney and client in connection with the attorney providing legal services. Having the client authorize disclosure to the third person doesn’t save the privilege. There is no privilege for an attorney communicating with a third-party. The clients need to be clearly informed about the confidentiality issue before they permit any disclosure.

Another issue is client-communication. For example, in an estate planning situation, when an elder or disabled person needs a will, he or she may visit an attorney while accompanied by a family member. Due to the confidentiality issue, the attorney wishes to talk to the client alone. In the meantime, if the client keeps the family member in present during the meeting, the attorney needs to observe whether the client makes the decision himself or herself. If the client has trouble communicating, and the attorney communicates with the family member more often, an ethical issue may arise. For instance, if Mom is disabled and needs a will, but Daughter is the one mainly talks to the attorney, and Daughter is the beneficiary of the will, it may raise concerns that Mom is under influence or control of Daughter, especially when Daughter is the only one taking care of Mom. To eliminate these concerns, the attorney may request a private conversation with Mom. This may create tension between Daughter and attorney, and even create trouble for Daughter and Mom.

To release the tension, the attorney needs to co-operate with the client and the third-party. First, the attorney should explain to the client the confidentiality issue in the first place to avoid any confusion. Second, if the client insists involving a third-party to help the whole process, if the attorney has any concern about undue influence, rather than accuse the third-party, he or she should explain in details about the legal requirement on the client’s independent decisions. On the other side, the attorney’s insistence on talking to the client alone also removes doubts on the third-party in the future. Finally, if the third-party still refuse private communication between the client and the attorney, the attorney may withdraw himself or herself, and even report this suspicious situation.

Involving a third-party is quite common in elder and disability cases. How to deal with the third-party while still maintain a good relationship with the client is a critical skill for new lawyers.